DR – October 8, 2017

Daily Recovery Readings for October 8, 2017:

Daily Reflection

DAILY INVENTORY

. . . and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.

— ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, p. 59

I was beginning to approach my new life of sobriety with unaccustomed enthusiasm. New friends were cropping up and some of my battered friendships had begun to be repaired. Life was exciting, and I even began to enjoy my work, becoming so bold as to issue a report on the lack of proper care for some of our clients. One day a co-worker informed me that my boss was really sore because a complaint, submitted over his head, had caused him much discomfort at the hands of his superiors. I knew that my report had created the problem, and began to feel responsible for my boss’s difficulty. In discussing the affair, my co-worker tried to reassure me that an apology was not necessary, but I soon became convinced that I had to do something, regardless of how it might turn out. When I approached my boss and owned up to my hand in his difficulties, he was surprised. But unexpected things came out of our encounter, and my boss and I were able to agree to interact more directly and effectively in the future.

From the book Daily Reflections
Copyright © 1990 by Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc.

Big Book Quote

Alcoholics who have derided religious people will be helped by such contacts. Being possessed of a spiritual experience, the alcoholic will find he has much in common with these people, though he may differ with them on many matters. If he does not argue about religion, he will make new friends and is sure to find new avenues of
usefulness and pleasure. He and his family can be a bright spot in such congregations. He may bring new hope and new courage to many a priest, minister, or rabbi, who gives his all to minister to our troubled world. We intend the foregoing as a helpful suggestion only. So far as we are concerned, there is nothing obligatory about it. As non-denominational people, we cannot make up others’ minds for them. Each individual should consult his own conscience.

~Alcoholics Anonymous, 4th Edition, The Family Afterward, pg. 131~

Keep It Simple

Just Say No.— Nancy Reagan

We addicts were great at saying no. Our spouse asked us to help around the house and we said no and went drinking. Friends tried to care, but we said, “No, mind your own business!” Our parents or our kids begged us to stop drinking, but we said no. We were also ask to say yes. We always said yes when asked if we wanted to have a drink or get high. Addiction really mixed us up. When we said no, we should have said yes. And when we said yes we should have said no.

In recovery, we do things better. We say yes when others ask for help. We say yes when somebody wants to give us love. We say no to alcohol and other drugs. We finally answer yes and no the right way—the right way and at the right time for us.

Prayer for the Day:
Higher Power, help me to always say yes to You, even when I’m tired or angry.

Action for the Day:
In today’s inventory, I’ll ask myself if there are any ways I’m still saying no to my program and Higher Power.

Daily Horoscope – Cancer

Your desires are pretty simple today. You’re not expecting the Moon and the Stars, only the loyalty of a close friend. Nevertheless, you’re concerned that you still may be asking for too much while needy Venus in your 3rd House of Communication squares naysaying Saturn. But don’t assume the worst; your positive attitude improves the interpersonal dynamics, paving a road to emotional fulfillment. Professor Scott Sorrell said, “You make the world a better place by making yourself a better person.”

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